Hint: Use 'j' and 'k' keys
to move up and down

National Post Sports

Two points from defeat, Sara Errani rallied to force a third-set tiebreaker and outlasted Venus Williams in a back-and-forth match at the U.S. Open.Errani won 6-0, 0-6, 7-6 (5) in the third round Friday after Williams had a chance to serve out the match in the final set.Williams twice came back from down a break in the third but was done in by too many unforced errors. She had 52 in the match.(Photo by Alex Goodlett/Getty Images)

Two points from defeat, Sara Errani rallied to force a third-set tiebreaker and outlasted Venus Williams in a back-and-forth match at the U.S. Open.

Errani won 6-0, 0-6, 7-6 (5) in the third round Friday after Williams had a chance to serve out the match in the final set.

Williams twice came back from down a break in the third but was done in by too many unforced errors. She had 52 in the match.

(Photo by Alex Goodlett/Getty Images)

How Milos Raonic perfected the booming serve that made him a star: The man who helped create one of the hardest tennis serves on the planet says it all begins with the grip.Form your hand into a V, he says, with the index finger and thumb aligned across the beveled edge of the handle. That creates a slightly opened face with the racquet head and in turn creates more spin on the ball. Now get your feet slightly wider than shoulder-width apart and point your toes in a 45-degree angle to the baseline.From there, it’s about falling into a rhythm.Start with your arms and racquet high. Let them fall down. Then swing them back up again, while tossing the ball in front of you and lifting the racquet behind you.“One, two, three,” Casey Curtis says in a singsong cadence that could be set to a metronome.This is the basics of the serve Curtis taught world No. 6 Milos Raonic 15 years ago. The one that Raonic repeated over and over and over again until he could do it in his sleep or, as Curtis suggests, with his eyes closed. Read the full story.

How Milos Raonic perfected the booming serve that made him a star: The man who helped create one of the hardest tennis serves on the planet says it all begins with the grip.

Form your hand into a V, he says, with the index finger and thumb aligned across the beveled edge of the handle. That creates a slightly opened face with the racquet head and in turn creates more spin on the ball. Now get your feet slightly wider than shoulder-width apart and point your toes in a 45-degree angle to the baseline.

From there, it’s about falling into a rhythm.

Start with your arms and racquet high. Let them fall down. Then swing them back up again, while tossing the ball in front of you and lifting the racquet behind you.

“One, two, three,” Casey Curtis says in a singsong cadence that could be set to a metronome.

This is the basics of the serve Curtis taught world No. 6 Milos Raonic 15 years ago. The one that Raonic repeated over and over and over again until he could do it in his sleep or, as Curtis suggests, with his eyes closed.

Read the full story.

'My job is not done': Eugenie Bouchard makes Canadian tennis history, reaches Wimbledon finalNear the end of an interview that went to air shortly before the second women’s semi-final match began at Wimbledon, after talking about her sense of history, and of the moment at hand, Eugenie Bouchard was asked about her career goals: “My ultimate goal is to win a grand slam.”The 20-year-old from Montreal will take her first shot this weekend, beating Romanian Simona Halep in straight sets, 7-6 (7-5), 6-2 on Thursday to become the first Canadian singles player to advance to the final at one of the sport’s four major tournaments. She will face Petra Kvitova, who won the earlier semi-final.“It’s always exciting and special when I can make history,” she said. “My job is not done. I want to go another step further.”Bouchard won on a warm afternoon in London, against a higher seed battling through an injury. (Photo: Glyn Kirk/AFP/Getty Images)

'My job is not done': Eugenie Bouchard makes Canadian tennis history, reaches Wimbledon final
Near the end of an interview that went to air shortly before the second women’s semi-final match began at Wimbledon, after talking about her sense of history, and of the moment at hand, Eugenie Bouchard was asked about her career goals: “My ultimate goal is to win a grand slam.”

The 20-year-old from Montreal will take her first shot this weekend, beating Romanian Simona Halep in straight sets, 7-6 (7-5), 6-2 on Thursday to become the first Canadian singles player to advance to the final at one of the sport’s four major tournaments. She will face Petra Kvitova, who won the earlier semi-final.

“It’s always exciting and special when I can make history,” she said. “My job is not done. I want to go another step further.”

Bouchard won on a warm afternoon in London, against a higher seed battling through an injury. (Photo: Glyn Kirk/AFP/Getty Images)

Remember that miserable Canadian winter we all suffered through, not so long ago? When watching the Winter Olympics was just about the only way to stay warm or, rather, feel warm and fuzzy about something, specifically — our athletes — and their medal haul, on the slopes, around the speed skating oval and in the hockey arena in Sochi?

Canada did what Canada does in winter sports, elbowing its way to the podium, waving the maple leaf with glee and giving us Hosers at home some new national heroes to celebrate. First among them, arguably, was Marie-Philip Poulin, a shy, polite, perfectly friendly French-Canadian, when not dressed in her hockey gear. On the ice Poulin was Clutch. She is an American Killer, and a scorer of two gold-medal sealing goals in Sochi — this after she scored the winning goal to beat the States in Vancouver four years before.

“Sidney Crosby is the best player in the world, in my opinion,” Louise Warren, Poulin’s college roommate at Boston University said after watching her pal dispatch of the U.S. “But I 100 per cent believe that [Poulin] is the best women’s hockey player in the world.”

A Canadian woman, and she is the best in the world. Poulin’s success in February stirred the patriotic spirit. But there are other rustlings out there. Canadian women are on the move. It is their time and, in England, at Wimbledon, it is Eugenie Bouchard’s time. (Photos: Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP/Getty Images, Clive Brunskill/Getty Images, Scott Halleran/Getty Images)

Wimbledon’s grass the fastest, French Open clay made of pulverized bricks: Everything you need to know about Grand Slam court surfacesThe differences have narrowed over the years, but the Grand Slam court surfaces still offer a study in contrasts

Wimbledon’s grass the fastest, French Open clay made of pulverized bricks: Everything you need to know about Grand Slam court surfaces
The differences have narrowed over the years, but the Grand Slam court surfaces still offer a study in contrasts

Trying to beat Rafael Nadal at the French Open is, without a doubt, the toughest task in tennis. Indeed, must be among the greatest challenges in all of sports.The pressure he applies, from set to set, game to game, point to point, shot to shot. That bullwhip of a high-bouncing, topspin lefty forehand. Those quick-reflex returns that help him break an opponent’s serve — and his will.Doing what he does so well on the red clay of Roland Garros, a surface and site he dominates so completely, the No. 1-seeded Nadal wore down No. 2 Novak Djokovic 3-6, 5-7, 2-6, 6-4 Sunday to win his ninth French Open championship and fifth in a row, both records.“For me,” Nadal said, “playing here in Roland Garros is just unforgettable, forever.” (Photo: Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images)

Trying to beat Rafael Nadal at the French Open is, without a doubt, the toughest task in tennis. Indeed, must be among the greatest challenges in all of sports.

The pressure he applies, from set to set, game to game, point to point, shot to shot. That bullwhip of a high-bouncing, topspin lefty forehand. Those quick-reflex returns that help him break an opponent’s serve — and his will.

Doing what he does so well on the red clay of Roland Garros, a surface and site he dominates so completely, the No. 1-seeded Nadal wore down No. 2 Novak Djokovic 3-6, 5-7, 2-6, 6-4 Sunday to win his ninth French Open championship and fifth in a row, both records.

“For me,” Nadal said, “playing here in Roland Garros is just unforgettable, forever.” (Photo: Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images)

'I felt like I was close': Eugenie Bouchard falls short against Maria Sharapova in French Open semi-finalCanada’s Eugenie Bouchard played like someone who belonged in the final four of a Grand Slam on Thursday.She gave Maria Sharapova a stiff challenge at the French Open before the Russian veteran pulled away late for a 4-6, 7-5, 6-2 victory, derailing Bouchard’s attempt to become the first Canadian to reach a major singles final in the Open era.As painful as the defeat was for the 20-year-old from Westmount, Que., it will go down as another valuable learning experience on the heels of her first Grand Slam semi-final appearance at this year’s Australian Open.A look of dejection was etched on her face as she left the court after the nearly 2 1/2-hour long match. (Photo by Darko Vojinovic/The Associated Press)

'I felt like I was close': Eugenie Bouchard falls short against Maria Sharapova in French Open semi-final
Canada’s Eugenie Bouchard played like someone who belonged in the final four of a Grand Slam on Thursday.

She gave Maria Sharapova a stiff challenge at the French Open before the Russian veteran pulled away late for a 4-6, 7-5, 6-2 victory, derailing Bouchard’s attempt to become the first Canadian to reach a major singles final in the Open era.

As painful as the defeat was for the 20-year-old from Westmount, Que., it will go down as another valuable learning experience on the heels of her first Grand Slam semi-final appearance at this year’s Australian Open.

A look of dejection was etched on her face as she left the court after the nearly 2 1/2-hour long match. (Photo by Darko Vojinovic/The Associated Press)

Is that a sceptre? Did Prince bring a sceptre to the French Open? Pop singer Prince, left, watches the fourth round match of the French Open tennis tournament between Spain’s Rafael Nadal and Serbia’s Dusan Lajovic at the Roland Garros stadium, in Paris, France, Monday, June 2, 2014. (Photo: Michel Spingler/The Associated Press)

Is that a sceptre? Did Prince bring a sceptre to the French Open? Pop singer Prince, left, watches the fourth round match of the French Open tennis tournament between Spain’s Rafael Nadal and Serbia’s Dusan Lajovic at the Roland Garros stadium, in Paris, France, Monday, June 2, 2014. (Photo: Michel Spingler/The Associated Press)

Novak Djokovic makes a friend: In the second set of Novak Djokovic’s 6-1, 6-2, 6-4 win over Joao Sousa at the French Open on Monday, a short shower stopped play for only a few minutes. Djokovic, wearing a white rain jacket, used the time to entertain the crowd by chatting with a ball boy and letting the youngster sit alongside him on the bench.At one point, Djokovic grabbed the umbrella out of the ball boy’s hand and in return gave him a racket. Then Djokovic handed him a bottle of Perrier, and the two clinked bottles before taking a sip.“We had a nice chat. He’s a tennis player, so I asked him how long he’s playing, and how he’s enjoying his time as a ball kid,” Djokovic said. “It was a nice, fun time, something unusual for the Grand Slams.” (Photo by Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images)

Novak Djokovic makes a friend: In the second set of Novak Djokovic’s 6-1, 6-2, 6-4 win over Joao Sousa at the French Open on Monday, a short shower stopped play for only a few minutes. Djokovic, wearing a white rain jacket, used the time to entertain the crowd by chatting with a ball boy and letting the youngster sit alongside him on the bench.

At one point, Djokovic grabbed the umbrella out of the ball boy’s hand and in return gave him a racket. Then Djokovic handed him a bottle of Perrier, and the two clinked bottles before taking a sip.

“We had a nice chat. He’s a tennis player, so I asked him how long he’s playing, and how he’s enjoying his time as a ball kid,” Djokovic said. “It was a nice, fun time, something unusual for the Grand Slams.” (Photo by Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images)

Throwback Monday?: Eugenie Bouchard of Canada poses in a traditional Baroque dress as she arrives for the Player Party during Day 3 of the Nuernberger Versicherungscup on May 19, 2014 in Nuremberg, Germany.  Bouchard, the second seed, swept past qualifier Anastasia Rodionova 6-0, 6-1 in just 45 minutes in the second round on Tuesday.Bouchard will face Kazakhstan’s Yaroslava Shvedova in Thursday’s quarter-final at the clay court French open tune-up tournament. (Photo by Dennis Grombkowski/Bongarts/Getty Images)

Throwback Monday?: Eugenie Bouchard of Canada poses in a traditional Baroque dress as she arrives for the Player Party during Day 3 of the Nuernberger Versicherungscup on May 19, 2014 in Nuremberg, Germany.  

Bouchard, the second seed, swept past qualifier Anastasia Rodionova 6-0, 6-1 in just 45 minutes in the second round on Tuesday.

Bouchard will face Kazakhstan’s Yaroslava Shvedova in Thursday’s quarter-final at the clay court French open tune-up tournament. (Photo by Dennis Grombkowski/Bongarts/Getty Images)