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Remember that miserable Canadian winter we all suffered through, not so long ago? When watching the Winter Olympics was just about the only way to stay warm or, rather, feel warm and fuzzy about something, specifically — our athletes — and their medal haul, on the slopes, around the speed skating oval and in the hockey arena in Sochi?

Canada did what Canada does in winter sports, elbowing its way to the podium, waving the maple leaf with glee and giving us Hosers at home some new national heroes to celebrate. First among them, arguably, was Marie-Philip Poulin, a shy, polite, perfectly friendly French-Canadian, when not dressed in her hockey gear. On the ice Poulin was Clutch. She is an American Killer, and a scorer of two gold-medal sealing goals in Sochi — this after she scored the winning goal to beat the States in Vancouver four years before.

“Sidney Crosby is the best player in the world, in my opinion,” Louise Warren, Poulin’s college roommate at Boston University said after watching her pal dispatch of the U.S. “But I 100 per cent believe that [Poulin] is the best women’s hockey player in the world.”

A Canadian woman, and she is the best in the world. Poulin’s success in February stirred the patriotic spirit. But there are other rustlings out there. Canadian women are on the move. It is their time and, in England, at Wimbledon, it is Eugenie Bouchard’s time. (Photos: Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP/Getty Images, Clive Brunskill/Getty Images, Scott Halleran/Getty Images)

Serena Williams upset a lot of people on Tuesday for her comments about the Steubenville rape case.
UPDATE: Williams says she’s reaching out to the family of the victim. In a statement released through her agent Wednesday, Williams says: “What was written — what I supposedly said — is insensitive and hurtful, and I by no means would say or insinuate that she was at all to blame.”
Williams said in an interview with Rolling Stone magazine that, while not blaming the victim (but kind of blaming the victim), “she shouldn’t have put herself in that position.”
According to the Rolling Stone story, Williams says the perpetrators of the crime “did something stupid,” and she asks: “Do you think it was fair, what they got?”
She adds, “I’m not blaming the girl, but if you’re a 16-year-old and you’re drunk like that, your parents should teach you: Don’t take drinks from other people.” (Photo: Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images)

Serena Williams upset a lot of people on Tuesday for her comments about the Steubenville rape case.

UPDATE: Williams says she’s reaching out to the family of the victim.

In a statement released through her agent Wednesday, Williams says: “What was written — what I supposedly said — is insensitive and hurtful, and I by no means would say or insinuate that she was at all to blame.”

Williams said in an interview with Rolling Stone magazine that, while not blaming the victim (but kind of blaming the victim), “she shouldn’t have put herself in that position.”

According to the Rolling Stone story, Williams says the perpetrators of the crime “did something stupid,” and she asks: “Do you think it was fair, what they got?”

She adds, “I’m not blaming the girl, but if you’re a 16-year-old and you’re drunk like that, your parents should teach you: Don’t take drinks from other people.” (Photo: Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images)

Taylor Crosby says she didn’t choose goaltending to avoid comparisons with her famous brother Sidney.

The younger sister of the NHL superstar thinks she’ll still be compared to him in terms of how far she goes in her hockey career. She’s OK with that.

“Even now, there is a comparison I think from the media or other people, but I don’t put it on myself,” Taylor said Thursday night in Calgary. “I think a lot of people will expect you to be a certain way or to be a certain type of player and be really good.

“I know I’m my own person. I try to use him as a role model and [follow] his work ethic, but I don’t compare myself to him. I’m never going to be him and he’s never going to be me.” (Photos: Jeff McIntosh/The Canadian Press)

Poor Lindsey Vonn: The Council of Fashion Designers of America awards must have whizzed by for the Olympic champion skier, considering testers from the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency escorted her to the women’s bathroom for an impromptu sample. Probably not very fun while wearing a custom gown.
“We appreciate her professionalism and for accommodating this process, which at times can be inconvenient,” USADA spokeswoman Annie Skinner said. (Photo: Brad Barket/Invision/Associated Press)

Poor Lindsey Vonn: The Council of Fashion Designers of America awards must have whizzed by for the Olympic champion skier, considering testers from the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency escorted her to the women’s bathroom for an impromptu sample. Probably not very fun while wearing a custom gown.

“We appreciate her professionalism and for accommodating this process, which at times can be inconvenient,” USADA spokeswoman Annie Skinner said. (Photo: Brad Barket/Invision/Associated Press)

Joe O’Connor: Sydney Leroux chose America, and struck at the heart of Canadian insecurity
Gerry Dobson is the dean of Canadian soccer broadcasting, a real pro, as is his partner in the broadcast booth, Craig Forrest who, once upon a time, was an actual soccer pro, toiling away in England.

This impeccably knowledgeable pair was calling a game on Sunday afternoon at BMO Field in Toronto, a so-called “friendly” match between the fiercest of international women’s soccer rivals, Canada and the United States. A record crowd was on hand. And all was going abysmally for the home team as the clocked ticked down.

The Americans led 2-0 when Sydney Leroux — the Surrey, B.C.-born and mostly Canadian-raised Sydney Leroux who had played for Canada as a junior — flashed past the Canadian defence. She deked the goalie. She booted home goal number three for her adopted homeland. (Ms. Leroux, a dual citizen, has an American father.)

It was a bitter slap, one made even worse after Ms. Leroux brandished the U.S. crest on her jersey, like a police badge, at the Canadian fans — before putting her fingers to her lips and shushing them. (Photo: Stanley Chou/Getty Images)

Saudi mountaineer Raha Moharrak celebrates on the summit of Mount Everest.  Raha Moharrak reached the summit of Nepal’s Mount Everest, the world’s highest peak, in a first for the conservative Muslim kingdom where women’s sports are severely restricted. (Photo: AFP PHOTO/ Ang Norbu SHERPA)

Saudi mountaineer Raha Moharrak celebrates on the summit of Mount Everest.  Raha Moharrak reached the summit of Nepal’s Mount Everest, the world’s highest peak, in a first for the conservative Muslim kingdom where women’s sports are severely restricted. (Photo: AFP PHOTO/ Ang Norbu SHERPA)

(Source: nationalpost.com)

Lindsey Vonn is at the Masters to watch boyfriend Tiger Woods go for his fifth green jacket — but don’t expect to see her following him around the course.

Vonn is still recovering from surgery on her right knee after a horrific ski crash that ended her season at the world championships two months ago. Vonn, who is still wearing a brace, said she will probably watch most of the tournament from the clubhouse.

“I can’t really walk too much,” Vonn told the New York Times. “And it’s so hilly here.”

FINALLY: Condoleezza Rice shows off her green jacket ahead of the Masters.

The home of the Masters, under increasing criticism the last decade because of its all-male membership, invited the former secretary of state and South Carolina financier Darla Moore to become the first women in green jackets last August when the club opens for a new season in October.
A debate about membership intensified in 2002 when Martha Burk of the National Council of Women’s Organizations urged the club to include women among its members.
Former club chairman Hootie Johnson stood his ground, even at the cost of losing Masters television sponsors for two years, when he famously said Augusta National might one day have a woman in a green jacket, “but not at the point of a bayonet.” (Photo: Ron Williams/The Associated Press)

FINALLY: Condoleezza Rice shows off her green jacket ahead of the Masters.

The home of the Masters, under increasing criticism the last decade because of its all-male membership, invited the former secretary of state and South Carolina financier Darla Moore to become the first women in green jackets last August when the club opens for a new season in October.

A debate about membership intensified in 2002 when Martha Burk of the National Council of Women’s Organizations urged the club to include women among its members.

Former club chairman Hootie Johnson stood his ground, even at the cost of losing Masters television sponsors for two years, when he famously said Augusta National might one day have a woman in a green jacket, “but not at the point of a bayonet.” (Photo: Ron Williams/The Associated Press)

Slovak cyclist Peter Sagan has apologized in a video message for pinching the bottom of a flower girl while they were on the podium at the Ronde of Flanders classic.
Sagan, who was second, could not keep his left hand to himself when Maja Leye kissed winner Fabian Cancellara on Sunday. With a smile, he theatrically touched her bottom. (Photo: Bryn Lennon/Getty Images)

Slovak cyclist Peter Sagan has apologized in a video message for pinching the bottom of a flower girl while they were on the podium at the Ronde of Flanders classic.

Sagan, who was second, could not keep his left hand to himself when Maja Leye kissed winner Fabian Cancellara on Sunday. With a smile, he theatrically touched her bottom. (Photo: Bryn Lennon/Getty Images)

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JUMP: Five-time champion Serena Williams advanced Tuesday to the Sony Open semi-finals and tied the women’s record for career victories in the tournament by beating No. 5-seeded Li Na 6-3, 7-6 (5).
The top-ranked Williams overcame six double-faults and rallied in the second set from a 5-2 deficit. She hit six winners in the tiebreaker, including a forehand passing shot cross-court on the final point.
When Williams smacked a winner on match point she jumped for joy cannonball-style, knees high and fist raised.
"I don’t usually leap like that in the quarter-final," she said. "But it was just a good shot." (Photo: Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images)

JUMP: Five-time champion Serena Williams advanced Tuesday to the Sony Open semi-finals and tied the women’s record for career victories in the tournament by beating No. 5-seeded Li Na 6-3, 7-6 (5).

The top-ranked Williams overcame six double-faults and rallied in the second set from a 5-2 deficit. She hit six winners in the tiebreaker, including a forehand passing shot cross-court on the final point.

When Williams smacked a winner on match point she jumped for joy cannonball-style, knees high and fist raised.

"I don’t usually leap like that in the quarter-final," she said. "But it was just a good shot." (Photo: Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images)