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National Post Sports

Former Los Angeles Dodger manager Tommy Lasorda, front left, joins Yogi Berra, who is honoured by the U.S. Navy for his service 70 years ago in the D-Day Invasion during a ceremony, Friday, June 6, 2014,  at the Yogi Berra Museum in Montclair, N.J. Berra was also presented with a quilt and a medal by Cmdr. Jim Wallace. (Photos: Rich Schultz/The Associated Press)

Finn, son of Scott Stallings of the U.S., plays during the Par 3 Contest prior the start of the 78th Masters Golf Tournament at Augusta National Golf Club on April 9, 2014 in Augusta, Georgia. Check out National Post Sports for more on the Masters. (Photo: Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)

Finn, son of Scott Stallings of the U.S., plays during the Par 3 Contest prior the start of the 78th Masters Golf Tournament at Augusta National Golf Club on April 9, 2014 in Augusta, Georgia. Check out National Post Sports for more on the Masters. (Photo: Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images)

Amid the jerseys and baseball bats held in a secure room at SCP Auctions, there’s a piece of sports memorabilia that speaks to much more than athletic prowess: an Olympic medal won by track star Jesse Owens at the 1936 Games in Berlin.

The medal — being auctioned online — recalls both the Nazi propaganda myths that Owens busted with his world record-setting 100-yard dash, and the American segregation that he came home to when he returned to the U.S. after the Games, which Adolf Hitler orchestrated to showcase his ideas of Aryan supremacism.

“Almost singlehandedly, Owens obliterated Hitler’s plans,” SCP Auctions partner Dan Imler said. “You’ve got an African American, son of a sharecropper, grandson of slaves who overcame these incredible circumstances and delivered a performance for the ages.” (Photos: The Associated Press)

Are those moon boots?: Figure skater Evan Lysacek, hockey player Julie Chu, and ice dancers Meryl Davis and Charlie White model the Olympic closing ceremony outfits by Ralph Lauren during 100 Days Out Sochi Winter Olympics Event at NBC’s TODAY Show on October 29, 2013 in New York City.  (Photo: Mike Stobe/Getty Images)

Are those moon boots?: Figure skater Evan Lysacek, hockey player Julie Chu, and ice dancers Meryl Davis and Charlie White model the Olympic closing ceremony outfits by Ralph Lauren during 100 Days Out Sochi Winter Olympics Event at NBC’s TODAY Show on October 29, 2013 in New York City.  (Photo: Mike Stobe/Getty Images)

Seven-time U.S. Sumo Champion Byambajav Ulambayar of Mongolia throws U.S.A.’s Kelly Gneiting (bottom) during the men’s heavyweight competition at the 13th U.S. Sumo Open at the Japanese American Cultural & Community Center Plaza on September 15, 2013 in downtown Los Angeles, California. Byambajav Ulambayar won the heavyweight competition. (Photo: Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images)

Seven-time U.S. Sumo Champion Byambajav Ulambayar of Mongolia throws U.S.A.’s Kelly Gneiting (bottom) during the men’s heavyweight competition at the 13th U.S. Sumo Open at the Japanese American Cultural & Community Center Plaza on September 15, 2013 in downtown Los Angeles, California. Byambajav Ulambayar won the heavyweight competition. (Photo: Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images)

With the 55th and last swing on the longest of many long points in the U.S. Open final, Rafael Nadal pushed a backhand into the net to get broken by Novak Djokovic.It could have been the beginning of the end for many players.Not for Nadal, who is as resilient as they come. A year after watching the Flushing Meadows title match on TV at home with a bad left knee, he is fit as can be — and, just maybe, better than ever.The No. 2-ranked Nadal emerged with his 13th Grand Slam title, and second at the U.S. Open, by withstanding No. 1 Djokovic’s similar brand of hustle-to-every-ball style and pulling away Monday to a tense, taut 6-2, 3-6, 6-4, 6-1 victory.“This season is probably the most emotional one in my career. I felt that I did everything right to have my chance here,” said Nadal, who dropped to the court and rolled over on his stomach, crying, after the last point, during the on-court trophy presentation. “I have to be almost perfect to win.” (Photo: Julie Jacobson/The Associated Press)

With the 55th and last swing on the longest of many long points in the U.S. Open final, Rafael Nadal pushed a backhand into the net to get broken by Novak Djokovic.

It could have been the beginning of the end for many players.

Not for Nadal, who is as resilient as they come. A year after watching the Flushing Meadows title match on TV at home with a bad left knee, he is fit as can be — and, just maybe, better than ever.

The No. 2-ranked Nadal emerged with his 13th Grand Slam title, and second at the U.S. Open, by withstanding No. 1 Djokovic’s similar brand of hustle-to-every-ball style and pulling away Monday to a tense, taut 6-2, 3-6, 6-4, 6-1 victory.

“This season is probably the most emotional one in my career. I felt that I did everything right to have my chance here,” said Nadal, who dropped to the court and rolled over on his stomach, crying, after the last point, during the on-court trophy presentation. “I have to be almost perfect to win.” (Photo: Julie Jacobson/The Associated Press)

Jump for joy: Fussing with her skirt and flubbing her shots, Serena Williams was troubled in the U.S. Open final by the swirling breeze and the strong play of Victoria Azarenka.After one early miss, Williams declared, “I can’t play in this wind.” After blowing a big lead and dropping the second set, Williams chucked her racket toward the sideline, and it bounced back onto the court.In the end, Williams pulled herself together, as she usually does when it matters the most. Facing her only test of the past two weeks, the No. 1-seeded Williams overcame No. 2 Azarenka 7-5, 6-7 (6), 6-1 on Sunday for a fifth championship at Flushing Meadows and second in a row. (Photo: Al Bello/Getty Images)

Jump for joy: Fussing with her skirt and flubbing her shots, Serena Williams was troubled in the U.S. Open final by the swirling breeze and the strong play of Victoria Azarenka.

After one early miss, Williams declared, “I can’t play in this wind.” After blowing a big lead and dropping the second set, Williams chucked her racket toward the sideline, and it bounced back onto the court.

In the end, Williams pulled herself together, as she usually does when it matters the most. Facing her only test of the past two weeks, the No. 1-seeded Williams overcame No. 2 Azarenka 7-5, 6-7 (6), 6-1 on Sunday for a fifth championship at Flushing Meadows and second in a row. (Photo: Al Bello/Getty Images)

Former NBA star Dennis Rodman checks in at a check in counter at the departure hall of Beijing Capital International Airport in Beijing on his way to North Korea; Rodman, third right, arrives at Pyongyang airport, North Korea, Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2013.

Rodman said he plans to hang out with authoritarian leader Kim Jong Un, have a good time and maybe bridge some cultural gaps — but not be a diplomat.

Rodman was greeted at Pyongyang’s airport by Son Kwang Ho, vice-chairman of North Korea’s Olympic Committee, just days after Pyongyang rejected a visit by a U.S. envoy who had hoped to bring home Kenneth Bae, an American missionary jailed there. The North abruptly called off the official visit because it said the U.S. had ruined the atmosphere for talks by holding a drill over South Korea with nuclear-capable B-52 bombers.

Rodman said the purpose of his visit was to display his friendship for Kim and North Korea and to “show people around the world that we as Americans can actually get along with North Korea.” (Photos: Andy Wong/The Associated Press, Jon Chol Jin/The Associated Press)

It was a little rainy at the U.S. Open on Monday. (Photos: Mike Stobe/Getty Images for the USTA, Mike Groll/The Associated Press, Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images)

Victoria Azarenka of Belarus watches the ball clear the net on a return to Alize Cornet of France during their U.S. Open women’s singles match at the USTA Billie Jean King National Center August 31, 2013 in New York. (Photo: Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images)

Victoria Azarenka of Belarus watches the ball clear the net on a return to Alize Cornet of France during their U.S. Open women’s singles match at the USTA Billie Jean King National Center August 31, 2013 in New York. (Photo: Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images)