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Canada limped out of the 2013 Davis Cup semi-final with three losses to Serbia, and two bruised bodies.

The Canadian team’s Davis Cup run came to an end Sunday as Janko Tipsarevic beat Vasek Pospisil 7-6 (3), 6-2, 7-6 (6), giving Serbia the 3-2 win in the best-of-five tie.

Pospisil was injured on the final point when he dove to hit a volley that was returned for the final point. (Photos: AFP/Getty Images, Darko Vojinovic/The Associated Press)

With the 55th and last swing on the longest of many long points in the U.S. Open final, Rafael Nadal pushed a backhand into the net to get broken by Novak Djokovic.It could have been the beginning of the end for many players.Not for Nadal, who is as resilient as they come. A year after watching the Flushing Meadows title match on TV at home with a bad left knee, he is fit as can be — and, just maybe, better than ever.The No. 2-ranked Nadal emerged with his 13th Grand Slam title, and second at the U.S. Open, by withstanding No. 1 Djokovic’s similar brand of hustle-to-every-ball style and pulling away Monday to a tense, taut 6-2, 3-6, 6-4, 6-1 victory.“This season is probably the most emotional one in my career. I felt that I did everything right to have my chance here,” said Nadal, who dropped to the court and rolled over on his stomach, crying, after the last point, during the on-court trophy presentation. “I have to be almost perfect to win.” (Photo: Julie Jacobson/The Associated Press)

With the 55th and last swing on the longest of many long points in the U.S. Open final, Rafael Nadal pushed a backhand into the net to get broken by Novak Djokovic.

It could have been the beginning of the end for many players.

Not for Nadal, who is as resilient as they come. A year after watching the Flushing Meadows title match on TV at home with a bad left knee, he is fit as can be — and, just maybe, better than ever.

The No. 2-ranked Nadal emerged with his 13th Grand Slam title, and second at the U.S. Open, by withstanding No. 1 Djokovic’s similar brand of hustle-to-every-ball style and pulling away Monday to a tense, taut 6-2, 3-6, 6-4, 6-1 victory.

“This season is probably the most emotional one in my career. I felt that I did everything right to have my chance here,” said Nadal, who dropped to the court and rolled over on his stomach, crying, after the last point, during the on-court trophy presentation. “I have to be almost perfect to win.” (Photo: Julie Jacobson/The Associated Press)

Jump for joy: Fussing with her skirt and flubbing her shots, Serena Williams was troubled in the U.S. Open final by the swirling breeze and the strong play of Victoria Azarenka.After one early miss, Williams declared, “I can’t play in this wind.” After blowing a big lead and dropping the second set, Williams chucked her racket toward the sideline, and it bounced back onto the court.In the end, Williams pulled herself together, as she usually does when it matters the most. Facing her only test of the past two weeks, the No. 1-seeded Williams overcame No. 2 Azarenka 7-5, 6-7 (6), 6-1 on Sunday for a fifth championship at Flushing Meadows and second in a row. (Photo: Al Bello/Getty Images)

Jump for joy: Fussing with her skirt and flubbing her shots, Serena Williams was troubled in the U.S. Open final by the swirling breeze and the strong play of Victoria Azarenka.

After one early miss, Williams declared, “I can’t play in this wind.” After blowing a big lead and dropping the second set, Williams chucked her racket toward the sideline, and it bounced back onto the court.

In the end, Williams pulled herself together, as she usually does when it matters the most. Facing her only test of the past two weeks, the No. 1-seeded Williams overcame No. 2 Azarenka 7-5, 6-7 (6), 6-1 on Sunday for a fifth championship at Flushing Meadows and second in a row. (Photo: Al Bello/Getty Images)

It was a little rainy at the U.S. Open on Monday. (Photos: Mike Stobe/Getty Images for the USTA, Mike Groll/The Associated Press, Stan Honda/AFP/Getty Images)

Victoria Azarenka of Belarus watches the ball clear the net on a return to Alize Cornet of France during their U.S. Open women’s singles match at the USTA Billie Jean King National Center August 31, 2013 in New York. (Photo: Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images)

Victoria Azarenka of Belarus watches the ball clear the net on a return to Alize Cornet of France during their U.S. Open women’s singles match at the USTA Billie Jean King National Center August 31, 2013 in New York. (Photo: Don Emmert/AFP/Getty Images)

Tennis players around the world have learned plenty from Rafael Nadal.

On Tuesday, Nadal learned something from Conner Stroud.

Stroud, a 12-year-old from Spindale, N.C., was born without hips, ankles, femurs or knees. Encouraged by parents who wouldn’t allow their son’s disability to hold him back, Stroud has been playing against able-bodied kids in local tennis tournaments, winning a couple and inspiring people young and old.

Stroud visited the U.S. Open and spent some time with Nadal, who signed autographs and chatted with the youngster outside Arthur Ashe Stadium.

“The most important thing is that he’s happy,” Nadal said. “He’s able to keep practicing the sport. He’s playing tennis. That’s great for him, for the family. That’s a great example that you can be happy even if life doesn’t give you everything. It’s a big example for me and should be a big example for a lot of people.” (Photos: Matthew Stockman/Getty Images, Bob Leverone/Getty Images, Dave Dellinger/The Associated Press/USTA)

Milos Raonic called it a learning experience.

It certainly wasn’t the victory party the Uniprix Stadium crowd was hoping for as Rafael Nadal took only one hour eight minutes to down Canada’s top tennis player 6-2, 6-2 in the US$3.49 million Rogers Cup final on Sunday.

But it had taken 55 years for a Canadian just to get to the final of the country’s biggest tournament, so Raonic had much to celebrate despite the defeat. (Photos: Matthew Stockman/Getty Images, Paul Chiasson/The Canadian Press)

Eugenie Bouchard continues to shine in the spotlightWhen tournament organizers booked Eugenie Bouchard for Centre Court on Tuesday, there was the potential for big-time disappointment.After all, the 19-year-old might be Canada’s rising female tennis star, but she was only ranked 62nd in the world. And here she was, not only featured heavily in promotional material around the Rogers Cup, but was scheduled to play her opening round match against a former top-20 player in a spot usually designated for players who have at least won a tournament.It could have another example of giving a young player too much too soon. Instead, it was another chance for Bouchard to show that she has both the on-court and off-court maturity to handle any challenge thrown at her. (Photo: Andy Lyons/Getty Images)

Eugenie Bouchard continues to shine in the spotlight
When tournament organizers booked Eugenie Bouchard for Centre Court on Tuesday, there was the potential for big-time disappointment.

After all, the 19-year-old might be Canada’s rising female tennis star, but she was only ranked 62nd in the world. And here she was, not only featured heavily in promotional material around the Rogers Cup, but was scheduled to play her opening round match against a former top-20 player in a spot usually designated for players who have at least won a tournament.

It could have another example of giving a young player too much too soon. Instead, it was another chance for Bouchard to show that she has both the on-court and off-court maturity to handle any challenge thrown at her. (Photo: Andy Lyons/Getty Images)

A glance at the list of men’s singles champions at Wimbledon the last dozen years reveals plenty of pleasant-enough looking chaps, though not a single slam-dunk male model in the bunch.

No matter. Each one was instantly fawned over the moment he held the trophy aloft, celebrated for toughness, smarts and the kind of devotion that knows no quit.

Marion Bartoli displayed all of those qualities — and more — on the way to winning Wimbledon in this most tumultuous of years. But because she’s a woman, at least one man behind a microphone couldn’t stop there. (Photos: Mike Hewitt/Getty Images, Eamonn M. McCormack/Getty Images, Glyn Kirk/AFP/Getty Images, Julian Finney/Getty Images, Stefan Wermuth/The Associated Press)

Top: Andy Murray ended Great Britain’s 77-year drought in the men’s tournament at Wimbledon on Sunday. Bottom: Murray’s grandparents, Shirley and Roy Erskine, look at the morning newspapers Monday July 8, 2013 at their home in Dunblane, Scotland. (Photos: Andrew Milligan/The Associated Press, Glyn Kirk/AFP/Getty Images)