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It wasn’t quite sex on skates, but suffice to say Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir showed a steamier side of themselves this season in the free dance they took into Saturday’s ice dancing finale at the world figure skating championships.The 2010 Olympic champions’ performance to a suite from the opera Carmen was racy, fast, powerful and — to the naked eye — hard to fault.And yet, it wasn’t good enough to keep from losing yet more ground to their Detroit training partners and, for all intents and purposes, their only rivals, Americans Meryl Davis and Charlie White. (Photo: Dave Sandford/Getty Images)

It wasn’t quite sex on skates, but suffice to say Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir showed a steamier side of themselves this season in the free dance they took into Saturday’s ice dancing finale at the world figure skating championships.

The 2010 Olympic champions’ performance to a suite from the opera Carmen was racy, fast, powerful and — to the naked eye — hard to fault.

And yet, it wasn’t good enough to keep from losing yet more ground to their Detroit training partners and, for all intents and purposes, their only rivals, Americans Meryl Davis and Charlie White. (Photo: Dave Sandford/Getty Images)

Kim Yu-na returned to the ice, but everyone was buzzing about Canada’s Kaetlyn Osmond on Thursday, who is from Newfoundland.


Osmond landed a triple-triple combination, a triple flip and a double Axel, and never let up on the accelerator, and was rewarded with the eighth-best score recorded by a female skater this season, 64.73, the fifth personal best in as many skates by Canadians this week. (Photo: Geoff Robbins/AFP/Getty Images)

(Source: sports.nationalpost.com)


Kim Yu-na’s performances in Vancouver were so majestic it seemed unlikely anyone could ever come that close to perfection again.
“The Queen” sure wants to try.

The Olympic gold medallist returns to major competition for the first time in two years at this week’s World Figure Skating Championships, and she looked so sharp in practices Monday and Tuesday it was as if she had never been away.

“After I won the Olympics, like any other gold medallist out there, I did feel some emptiness in my heart,” Kim, speaking through a translator, said Tuesday night. “I did think about coming back for a long time. What motivated me was that skating is something I’m best at. And it’s something that I love the most, so I want to give it one more try.” (Photo: Toru Yamanaka/AFP/Getty Images)

Kim Yu-na’s performances in Vancouver were so majestic it seemed unlikely anyone could ever come that close to perfection again.

“The Queen” sure wants to try.

The Olympic gold medallist returns to major competition for the first time in two years at this week’s World Figure Skating Championships, and she looked so sharp in practices Monday and Tuesday it was as if she had never been away.

“After I won the Olympics, like any other gold medallist out there, I did feel some emptiness in my heart,” Kim, speaking through a translator, said Tuesday night. “I did think about coming back for a long time. What motivated me was that skating is something I’m best at. And it’s something that I love the most, so I want to give it one more try.” (Photo: Toru Yamanaka/AFP/Getty Images)

(Source: sports.nationalpost.com)

Cramping their style: Canada’s two-time world ice dance champions Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir lost to American rivals Meryl Davis and Charlie White for the second consecutive competition at the Four Continents championships on Sunday.Virtue and Moir had a strong start to their sizzling “Carmen” program, but had to stop about three minutes in when Virtue felt a cramp in her leg. The Canadians were able to resume a couple of minutes later.“I just had some cramp in my legs to deal with. I’m glad we collected ourselves and kept pushing through the program,” Virtue said. (Photo by Atsushi Tomura/Getty Images)

Cramping their style: Canada’s two-time world ice dance champions Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir lost to American rivals Meryl Davis and Charlie White for the second consecutive competition at the Four Continents championships on Sunday.

Virtue and Moir had a strong start to their sizzling “Carmen” program, but had to stop about three minutes in when Virtue felt a cramp in her leg. The Canadians were able to resume a couple of minutes later.

“I just had some cramp in my legs to deal with. I’m glad we collected ourselves and kept pushing through the program,” Virtue said. (Photo by Atsushi Tomura/Getty Images)

Our obsession with figure skating continues at the U.S. championships: Agnes Zawadzki competes in the Ladies Short Program during the U.S. Figure Skating Championships at CenturyLink Center in Omaha, Nebraska.  (Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images)

Our obsession with figure skating continues at the U.S. championships: Agnes Zawadzki competes in the Ladies Short Program during the U.S. Figure Skating Championships at CenturyLink Center in Omaha, Nebraska.  (Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images)

Upside down: Aliona Savchenko and Robin Szolkowy of Russia perform during their pairs short program during European Figure Skating Championship  in Zagreb, on January 23, 2013. They placed second.  (Photo: HRVOJE POLAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Upside down: Aliona Savchenko and Robin Szolkowy of Russia perform during their pairs short program during European Figure Skating Championship  in Zagreb, on January 23, 2013. They placed second.  (Photo: HRVOJE POLAN/AFP/Getty Images)

Silver lining: World champions Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir of Canada settled for silver in ice dancing after losing out to Americans Meryl Davis and Charlie White in the Grand Prix Final on Saturday in Sochi, Russia.

“It was a great skate for us,” said Virtue. “We had to fight through it but that’s not surprising considering the intensity of the competition. We are where we want to be at this point and we just have to go home and fine tune the program. There’s a lot of room to grow.” (Clockwise from top left: Russia’s Ekaterina Bobrova and Dmitry Soloviev, Virtue and Moir, Davis and White; Photos by Alexander Nemenov/AFP/Getty Images, Ivan Sekretarev/The Associated Press, Yuri Kadobnov/AFP/Getty Images)

This one is for all the marbles: Canada’s Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir sit in second place heading into Saturday at the Grand Prix figure skating final in Russia after their performance on Friday.

Other photos: Japan’s Akiko Suzuki performs during her women’s short program, but at right, Japan’s Mao Asada leads. (Photo: ALEXANDER NEMENOV/AFP/Getty Images and YURI KADOBNOV/AFP/Getty Images)

Canadian Kyle Croxall, the 2012 overall champion, kicked off the 2013 Red Bull Crashed Ice world championships with a win in Niagara Falls. Ottawa’s Fannie Desforges won the women’s event.  (Photos: CNW Group/Red Bull Crashed Ice)

(Source: sports.nationalpost.com)

This weekend, 200 participants will be in Niagara Falls to take part a sport called ice cross downhill but known more widely known as Crashed Ice, which began as a marketing tool hatched by the makers of an energy drink. Participation has grown, and while it will not make the skaters rich, it does offer the promise of at least fleeting fame.The premise: Four skaters begin at the top of an ice track, racing each other to the bottom in a race that mixes elements of ice skating, downhill skiing, luge and a general disregard for personal safety.In Niagara Falls, which is staging the event for the first time, the track is 460 metres long, with a half-dozen jumps. It looks like an extra-wide bobsleigh track, and organizers say it took about 7,500 hours to assemble. (Photo: Jorg Mitter/Red Bull)

This weekend, 200 participants will be in Niagara Falls to take part a sport called ice cross downhill but known more widely known as Crashed Ice, which began as a marketing tool hatched by the makers of an energy drink. Participation has grown, and while it will not make the skaters rich, it does offer the promise of at least fleeting fame.

The premise: Four skaters begin at the top of an ice track, racing each other to the bottom in a race that mixes elements of ice skating, downhill skiing, luge and a general disregard for personal safety.

In Niagara Falls, which is staging the event for the first time, the track is 460 metres long, with a half-dozen jumps. It looks like an extra-wide bobsleigh track, and organizers say it took about 7,500 hours to assemble. (Photo: Jorg Mitter/Red Bull)