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The Miami Marlins lost much more than a game Thursday night. They likely have lost slugger Giancarlo Stanton for the rest of the season after a frightening scene at Miller Park.

Stanton sustained multiple facial fractures, dental damage and cuts that needed stitches after being hit in the face by a fastball from Milwaukee’s Mike Fiers.

Stanton’s father was at the game and came onto the field while his son was treated. Stanton was bleeding heavily from his mouth, then was driven away from the plate in an ambulance. His dad rode with him to the hospital.

It was ruled that Stanton swung trying to get out of the way of the 88 mph pitch from Fiers. Reed Johnson batted for Stanton and was hit in the hand by Fiers’ next pitch, triggering a bench-clearing brawl.

“I’ve never seen anything like that and I’ve definitely never seen two swings called on those two plays,” Marlins manager Mike Redmond said. “I’ve never seen a guy get hit in the mouth and called for a swing. He’s out there bleeding at home plate and for the first base ump to say he swung at that pitch, what a joke.” (Photos: Morry Gash/The Associated Press, Mike McGinnis/Getty Images)

Former Montreal Canadiens captain Saku Koivu has announced his retirement.Koivu, 39, played for Montreal from 1995 through 2009 and was captain from 1999 on.During his time with the Habs, the Finnish forward was diagnosed with non-Hodgkins lymphoma and missed almost all of the 2001-02 season before making an emotional return.“Looking back at my 22 years of pro hockey first in Finland and then in the NHL I feel truly blessed and fulfilled,” he said in a statement released by the NHL Players’ Association. (Photo: Postmedia News)

Former Montreal Canadiens captain Saku Koivu has announced his retirement.

Koivu, 39, played for Montreal from 1995 through 2009 and was captain from 1999 on.

During his time with the Habs, the Finnish forward was diagnosed with non-Hodgkins lymphoma and missed almost all of the 2001-02 season before making an emotional return.

“Looking back at my 22 years of pro hockey first in Finland and then in the NHL I feel truly blessed and fulfilled,” he said in a statement released by the NHL Players’ Association. (Photo: Postmedia News)

Morgan Rielly questioned the ability of his starting goaltender (“I’ve got to pull him, I think,” he said of Bernier. “Put Reims in”) and his team’s lack of leadership (“Is Bozak wearing an ‘A’ in this?” he asked. “That’s a joke”). And with the first period winding down and the Leafs trailing 3-1 in the new EA Sports video game NHL 15, he was picturing what head coach Randy Carlyle might say in a real setting.“Yeah, Randy would be rattled,” said Rielly. “How we’re not playing his style.”It was meant as a joke. After all, Rielly and Pacioretty could hardly be taken seriously the way they were dressed. Moments earlier, EA Sports had recorded the pair skating around in motion-capture suits for later use. That meant wearing a black spandex bodysuit that looked like it was covered in white cotton balls, a white helmet, shin pads and elbow pads. (Photo: Michael Traikos/National Post)

Morgan Rielly questioned the ability of his starting goaltender (“I’ve got to pull him, I think,” he said of Bernier. “Put Reims in”) and his team’s lack of leadership (“Is Bozak wearing an ‘A’ in this?” he asked. “That’s a joke”). And with the first period winding down and the Leafs trailing 3-1 in the new EA Sports video game NHL 15, he was picturing what head coach Randy Carlyle might say in a real setting.

“Yeah, Randy would be rattled,” said Rielly. “How we’re not playing his style.”

It was meant as a joke. After all, Rielly and Pacioretty could hardly be taken seriously the way they were dressed. Moments earlier, EA Sports had recorded the pair skating around in motion-capture suits for later use. That meant wearing a black spandex bodysuit that looked like it was covered in white cotton balls, a white helmet, shin pads and elbow pads. (Photo: Michael Traikos/National Post)

Through a pair of back-and-forth sets, Novak Djokovic and Andy Murray put on a display befitting a matchup of past U.S. Open champions.They tracked down would-be winners and somehow got them back, prolonging points that involved 10 or 20 strokes or more, extended by Djokovic’s slides and splits or Murray’s gifted anticipation. After one 30-shot masterpiece on his way to victory, Djokovic raised his right fist, bellowed, “Come on!” and windmilled his arms to rile up the crowd.Eventually, the physically demanding action proved too much for a fading Murray, and Djokovic pulled away to win 7-6 (1), 6-7 (1), 6-2, 6-4 and reach the tournament’s semi-finals for the eighth consecutive year.“I knew coming into tonight’s match that it’s going to be tough, that he’s going to go for his shots, and the more aggressive one would win it,” the No. 1-ranked and No. 1-seeded Djokovic said. “I’m glad I managed to stay fit in the end and pull it through.”It took a while for him to push out front in a 3-hour, 32-minute match that ended after 1 a.m. Thursday. (Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images)

Through a pair of back-and-forth sets, Novak Djokovic and Andy Murray put on a display befitting a matchup of past U.S. Open champions.

They tracked down would-be winners and somehow got them back, prolonging points that involved 10 or 20 strokes or more, extended by Djokovic’s slides and splits or Murray’s gifted anticipation. After one 30-shot masterpiece on his way to victory, Djokovic raised his right fist, bellowed, “Come on!” and windmilled his arms to rile up the crowd.

Eventually, the physically demanding action proved too much for a fading Murray, and Djokovic pulled away to win 7-6 (1), 6-7 (1), 6-2, 6-4 and reach the tournament’s semi-finals for the eighth consecutive year.

“I knew coming into tonight’s match that it’s going to be tough, that he’s going to go for his shots, and the more aggressive one would win it,” the No. 1-ranked and No. 1-seeded Djokovic said. “I’m glad I managed to stay fit in the end and pull it through.”

It took a while for him to push out front in a 3-hour, 32-minute match that ended after 1 a.m. Thursday. (Photo by Matthew Stockman/Getty Images)

A cycling enthusiast ride a bicycle near the finish of the 11th stage of the Spanish Vuelta cycling race, a 153,4 kilometer (95 mile) leg between Pamplona and Santuario de Aralar, Spain, Wednesday, Sept. 3, 2014. (Photo: Ivan Aguinaga/The Associated Press)

A cycling enthusiast ride a bicycle near the finish of the 11th stage of the Spanish Vuelta cycling race, a 153,4 kilometer (95 mile) leg between Pamplona and Santuario de Aralar, Spain, Wednesday, Sept. 3, 2014. (Photo: Ivan Aguinaga/The Associated Press)

On a warm Monday afternoon in Hamilton, the Toronto Argonauts were preparing for a game in which they would have no shelter from the elements. There was a problem with the air conditioning in the dressing room, a staff member grumbled — there was no air conditioning.There was also allegedly no electricity in the outlets, meaning the giant fans were fixed to extension cords that snaked out in search of electricity somewhere down the the hall. The Hamilton Tiger-Cats were also said to be without air conditioning before the game, when owner Bob Young was holding court on the field, his usual yellow hat paired with a blue business suit and a pair of steel-toed construction boots.“It’s all been sweetness and light,” Young said wryly. “It’s been a path strewn with roses for the last four years. And look at the results. I mean, can you imagine it was anything but a path strewn with roses?”On the surface, that is exactly how it appeared. After a delay of more than a month, Tim Hortons Field finally opened to fans bathing in sun-splashed stands, walking along clean concourses and into a prosperous future that seemed impossible a decade ago. (Photo: Aaron Lynett/The Canadian Press)

On a warm Monday afternoon in Hamilton, the Toronto Argonauts were preparing for a game in which they would have no shelter from the elements. There was a problem with the air conditioning in the dressing room, a staff member grumbled — there was no air conditioning.

There was also allegedly no electricity in the outlets, meaning the giant fans were fixed to extension cords that snaked out in search of electricity somewhere down the the hall. The Hamilton Tiger-Cats were also said to be without air conditioning before the game, when owner Bob Young was holding court on the field, his usual yellow hat paired with a blue business suit and a pair of steel-toed construction boots.

“It’s all been sweetness and light,” Young said wryly. “It’s been a path strewn with roses for the last four years. And look at the results. I mean, can you imagine it was anything but a path strewn with roses?”

On the surface, that is exactly how it appeared. After a delay of more than a month, Tim Hortons Field finally opened to fans bathing in sun-splashed stands, walking along clean concourses and into a prosperous future that seemed impossible a decade ago. (Photo: Aaron Lynett/The Canadian Press)

The Toronto Blue Jays wanted to give Derek Jeter a distinctly Canadian retirement present. So they decided to put him up in a “castle” in the Rockies.During a ceremony before Sunday’s game — Jeter’s final visit to the Rogers Centre with the New York Yankees — the Jays announced the gift they’d been keeping a secret from all inquisitors: three nights at the Fairmont Banff Springs — “where the scenery takes centre stage and Mother Nature is the architect for adventures.” They billed it as “a Canadian castle of the Rockies experience.” (Photo: Darren Calabrese/The Canadian Press)

The Toronto Blue Jays wanted to give Derek Jeter a distinctly Canadian retirement present. So they decided to put him up in a “castle” in the Rockies.

During a ceremony before Sunday’s game — Jeter’s final visit to the Rogers Centre with the New York Yankees — the Jays announced the gift they’d been keeping a secret from all inquisitors: three nights at the Fairmont Banff Springs — “where the scenery takes centre stage and Mother Nature is the architect for adventures.” They billed it as “a Canadian castle of the Rockies experience.” (Photo: Darren Calabrese/The Canadian Press)

Horsing around: Riders take part in the 160 km endurance competition of the 2014 FEI World Equestrian Games near Mont-Saint-Michel on August 28, 2014 in Genets, northwestern France. (Jean-Sebastien Evrard/AFP/Getty Images)

Horsing around: Riders take part in the 160 km endurance competition of the 2014 FEI World Equestrian Games near Mont-Saint-Michel on August 28, 2014 in Genets, northwestern France. (Jean-Sebastien Evrard/AFP/Getty Images)

The ice water challenge: People take part in the Winter Swimming Festival in front of the Perito Moreno glacier at the Argentino Lake in El Calafate, Santa Cruz province, Argentina on August 8, 2014, during the first competition of this extreme sport in the southern hemisphere. (Photo: Daniel Garcia/AFP/Getty Images)

The ice water challenge: People take part in the Winter Swimming Festival in front of the Perito Moreno glacier at the Argentino Lake in El Calafate, Santa Cruz province, Argentina on August 8, 2014, during the first competition of this extreme sport in the southern hemisphere. (Photo: Daniel Garcia/AFP/Getty Images)

Dragon chic: From left, Japanese fashion designer Yohji Yamamoto, Real’s James Rodriguez, Gareth Bale, Iker Casillas, Marcelo and Xabi Alonso, and Real’s representative Emilio Butragueno, right, pose for the photographers during the presentation of the Real Madrid’s new Champions League kit at the Santiago Bernabeu stadium in Madrid, Spain, Tuesday, Aug. 26, 2014. The new Champions League kit was designed by Yohji Yamamoto. Bottom: Bale’s new soccer shoes. (Photos: Andres Kudacki/The Associated Press)