Hint: Use 'j' and 'k' keys
to move up and down

National Post Sports

Canada’s Andrew Wiggins of Kansas was selected by the Cleveland Cavaliers with the No. 1 pick in the NBA draft on Thursday night.The Cavs went for a freshman from Vaughan, Ont., to open the draft for the second straight year and hope Wiggins works out better than Anthony Bennett of Brampton, Ont.Bennett was injured last summer, came into the season out of shape and made no impact, one of the reasons the Cavs were back in this spot again.But Wiggins seems a much more ready product after averaging a Kansas freshman-record 17.1 points. He might have ended up as the top pick anyway, but became the best option for the Cavs when Jayhawks teammate Joel Embiid suffered a stress fracture in his right foot shortly before the draft.“A thousand thoughts are going through my head right now,” Wiggins said. “It’s a dream come true. (Photo: Jason DeCrow/The Associated Press)

Canada’s Andrew Wiggins of Kansas was selected by the Cleveland Cavaliers with the No. 1 pick in the NBA draft on Thursday night.

The Cavs went for a freshman from Vaughan, Ont., to open the draft for the second straight year and hope Wiggins works out better than Anthony Bennett of Brampton, Ont.

Bennett was injured last summer, came into the season out of shape and made no impact, one of the reasons the Cavs were back in this spot again.

But Wiggins seems a much more ready product after averaging a Kansas freshman-record 17.1 points. He might have ended up as the top pick anyway, but became the best option for the Cavs when Jayhawks teammate Joel Embiid suffered a stress fracture in his right foot shortly before the draft.

“A thousand thoughts are going through my head right now,” Wiggins said. “It’s a dream come true. (Photo: Jason DeCrow/The Associated Press)

'This is a big f—-ing day': He’s the ultimate button-down, blue-suited mayor. But put Eric Garcetti in a hockey jersey and there’s no telling what he might do.On Monday, he let fly with the F-word in front of millions of people as he led his city in celebration of the Los Angeles Kings’ second Stanley Cup championship in three years. (Pictured: Kings goalie Jonathan Quick; photo by Harry How/Getty Images)

'This is a big f—-ing day': He’s the ultimate button-down, blue-suited mayor. But put Eric Garcetti in a hockey jersey and there’s no telling what he might do.

On Monday, he let fly with the F-word in front of millions of people as he led his city in celebration of the Los Angeles Kings’ second Stanley Cup championship in three years. (Pictured: Kings goalie Jonathan Quick; photo by Harry How/Getty Images)

The Los Angeles Kings were this close to tying the New York Rangers late in the third period of Game 4.Henrik Lundqvist, who faced 41 shots, including a lopsided third period in which the Kings outshot the home side 15-1, was both brilliant and incredibly lucky — yes, there’s that word again — in erecting a wall that just barely held, allowing the New York Rangers a 2-1 victory that let them live to see another day in the Stanley Cup final.Read the story here. (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)

The Los Angeles Kings were this close to tying the New York Rangers late in the third period of Game 4.

Henrik Lundqvist, who faced 41 shots, including a lopsided third period in which the Kings outshot the home side 15-1, was both brilliant and incredibly lucky — yes, there’s that word again — in erecting a wall that just barely held, allowing the New York Rangers a 2-1 victory that let them live to see another day in the Stanley Cup final.

Read the story here. (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)

One game into the New York-Los Angeles Stanley Cup final, we’ve already had plenty of celebrity sightings. Here are Will Ferrell and Larry David at Game 1 between the Rangers and Kings at the Staples Center. The Kings won 3-2 in overtime. (Photos by Noel Vasquez/Getty Images)

'It hurts more when you're close': Max Pacioretty was sitting with his hands on his thighs in a quiet corner of a quiet dressing room. Discarded balls of hockey tape were on both sides of where he sat, a used white towel was crumpled on a seat nearby, speckled with someone’s blood.

Max Pacioretty was sitting with his hands on his thighs in a quiet corner of a quiet dressing room. Discarded balls of hockey tape were on both sides of where he sat, a used white towel was crumpled on a seat nearby, speckled with someone’s blood.

“It hurts,” said Canadiens coach Michel Therrien. “And it hurts more when you’re close.” (Photos: Graham Hughes/The Canadian Press, Frank Franklin II/The Associated Press)

In the basement of her home in small-town Saskatchewan, Darlene Tokarski would roll up a pair of socks — usually a pair of her husband’s sturdy work socks — and fire away at her young son. He demanded that she play, and that he be the goaltender in a game they came to call “sockball.”
It was all Dustin Tokarski wanted to do.
“I could get him to do anything for sockball,” Darlene said on Friday. “Clean his room. Rake leaves. Do this. Do that. It was, ‘well, as soon as you do this, we’ll play sockball.’ And it was done.’ ”
Sockball evolved into hockey, and hockey evolved into an obsession, one that has carried him through a career marked by international victories, professional disappointment and, within the last week, a burst of stardom and opportunity. The sockball veteran is making a name for himself in the National Hockey League playoffs.
(Photo: Al Bello/Getty Images)

In the basement of her home in small-town Saskatchewan, Darlene Tokarski would roll up a pair of socks — usually a pair of her husband’s sturdy work socks — and fire away at her young son. He demanded that she play, and that he be the goaltender in a game they came to call “sockball.”

It was all Dustin Tokarski wanted to do.

“I could get him to do anything for sockball,” Darlene said on Friday. “Clean his room. Rake leaves. Do this. Do that. It was, ‘well, as soon as you do this, we’ll play sockball.’ And it was done.’ ”

Sockball evolved into hockey, and hockey evolved into an obsession, one that has carried him through a career marked by international victories, professional disappointment and, within the last week, a burst of stardom and opportunity. The sockball veteran is making a name for himself in the National Hockey League playoffs.

(Photo: Al Bello/Getty Images)

Derek Stepan played through a broken jaw on Thursday night, logging more than 17 minutes of ice time despite suffering the injury on a late and dangerous hit in the first period, according to his coach.Alain Vigneault said the 23-year-old was undergoing surgery on Friday, and that the team did not know he had broken his jaw until after the game. It is not known if Stepan will be available to play again in the Eastern Conference final, with Vigneault saying “we’ll have an idea of the time frame tomorrow.”Stepan absorbed a hard, high hit from Montreal Canadiens forward Brandon Prust in the first period of Game 3. He left the game, but returned a few minutes later.Prust was not penalized on the play, but has a phone hearing scheduled with the NHL on Friday afternoon. The revelation of Stepan’s injury will likely play a role in the severity of any supplementary discipline he might receive. (Photo by Al Bello/Getty Images)

Derek Stepan played through a broken jaw on Thursday night, logging more than 17 minutes of ice time despite suffering the injury on a late and dangerous hit in the first period, according to his coach.

Alain Vigneault said the 23-year-old was undergoing surgery on Friday, and that the team did not know he had broken his jaw until after the game. It is not known if Stepan will be available to play again in the Eastern Conference final, with Vigneault saying “we’ll have an idea of the time frame tomorrow.”

Stepan absorbed a hard, high hit from Montreal Canadiens forward Brandon Prust in the first period of Game 3. He left the game, but returned a few minutes later.

Prust was not penalized on the play, but has a phone hearing scheduled with the NHL on Friday afternoon. The revelation of Stepan’s injury will likely play a role in the severity of any supplementary discipline he might receive. (Photo by Al Bello/Getty Images)

Rémi Bourget wore the bear over his shoulder, like a shawl, until he realized it might not have been a good idea. The Montreal lawyer, who is an enthusiastic fan of the Canadiens, believed the bear was still a powerful symbol, but decided it was best to tuck it under the arena seats for the rest of the series, just to be safe.“Of course, sometimes it gets dirty down there, with people spilling their beer or their Coke,” Bourget said on Thursday. “And now it’s gone through a seven-game series, so like everyone, it’s not in as good a shape as it was.”Over the course of that seven-game series with the Boston Bruins, the bearskin Bourget and a group of his friends bought online became a minor celebrity. It travelled to Boston for Game 2, and it was in the Bell Centre for all three games in Montreal, put to use as a beacon for fans nervous about playing the big, bad Bruins.“It was important for us to show that we were not afraid of the bear, we were not afraid of poking the bear,” Bourget said. “There’s this expression in French … meaning you don’t sell the bearskin before you’ve killed it.” (Photo courtesy of Rémi Bourget)

Rémi Bourget wore the bear over his shoulder, like a shawl, until he realized it might not have been a good idea. The Montreal lawyer, who is an enthusiastic fan of the Canadiens, believed the bear was still a powerful symbol, but decided it was best to tuck it under the arena seats for the rest of the series, just to be safe.

“Of course, sometimes it gets dirty down there, with people spilling their beer or their Coke,” Bourget said on Thursday. “And now it’s gone through a seven-game series, so like everyone, it’s not in as good a shape as it was.”

Over the course of that seven-game series with the Boston Bruins, the bearskin Bourget and a group of his friends bought online became a minor celebrity. It travelled to Boston for Game 2, and it was in the Bell Centre for all three games in Montreal, put to use as a beacon for fans nervous about playing the big, bad Bruins.

“It was important for us to show that we were not afraid of the bear, we were not afraid of poking the bear,” Bourget said. “There’s this expression in French … meaning you don’t sell the bearskin before you’ve killed it.” (Photo courtesy of Rémi Bourget)

Why you should jump on the Canadiens’ bandwagonWhen the Montreal Canadiens became the only Canadian team to qualify for the playoffs, this newspaper predicted hockey fans across this country wouldn’t automatically hop on board the bandwagon.It made sense. The Habs weren’t Canada’s team. They were Montreal’s team. Toronto fans did not grow up reading The Hockey Sweater. Vancouver had no connection to Rocket Richard or Guy Lafleur.Cheer for the bleu, blanc et rouge? In Edmonton or Calgary? In Ottawa or Winnipeg? Tabernac!And then a funny thing happened. The Canadiens swept the Tampa Bay Lightning in the first round. And they followed it up on Wednesday by slaying the mighty Boston Bruins in a seven-game series where the little guys flexed their muscles against the bullies of the NHL. And now, with Montreal eight wins away from bringing the Stanley Cup back to Canada for the first time in 20 years, we don’t care where you’re from.We’re cheering for the Canadiens. (Photo: Elise Amendola/The Associated Press)

Why you should jump on the Canadiens’ bandwagon
When the Montreal Canadiens became the only Canadian team to qualify for the playoffs, this newspaper predicted hockey fans across this country wouldn’t automatically hop on board the bandwagon.

It made sense. The Habs weren’t Canada’s team. They were Montreal’s team. Toronto fans did not grow up reading The Hockey Sweater. Vancouver had no connection to Rocket Richard or Guy Lafleur.

Cheer for the bleu, blanc et rouge? In Edmonton or Calgary? In Ottawa or Winnipeg? Tabernac!

And then a funny thing happened. The Canadiens swept the Tampa Bay Lightning in the first round. And they followed it up on Wednesday by slaying the mighty Boston Bruins in a seven-game series where the little guys flexed their muscles against the bullies of the NHL. And now, with Montreal eight wins away from bringing the Stanley Cup back to Canada for the first time in 20 years, we don’t care where you’re from.

We’re cheering for the Canadiens. (Photo: Elise Amendola/The Associated Press)

'Everyone wants the Kane mullet': A friend’s six-year-old son was seated in Carmelo Preiti’s barber chair recently when the question was asked: How many lines did the young man want shaved into the side of his head?“How many does Patrick Kane have?” the six-year-old asked.Three.“Well I want three, then,” the boy responded.Preiti chuckled as he told the story on Thursday, a day after Kane, his most famous client, scored in overtime to help the Chicago Blackhawks tie their first-round series with the St. Louis Blues. The goal also placed a spotlight somewhere else, on something Preiti shaped with his own hands: Kane’s mullet. What began almost as a dare four years ago has become a tradition.Preiti estimated that as many as 30 clients have walked through his door requesting a Kane mullet since the beginning of the month. Last Tuesday, Kane returned with teammate Brandon Saad, and left Preiti’s chair with his lucky charm, his fresh playoff mullet. (Photo by Carmelo Preiti)

'Everyone wants the Kane mullet': A friend’s six-year-old son was seated in Carmelo Preiti’s barber chair recently when the question was asked: How many lines did the young man want shaved into the side of his head?

“How many does Patrick Kane have?” the six-year-old asked.

Three.

“Well I want three, then,” the boy responded.

Preiti chuckled as he told the story on Thursday, a day after Kane, his most famous client, scored in overtime to help the Chicago Blackhawks tie their first-round series with the St. Louis Blues. The goal also placed a spotlight somewhere else, on something Preiti shaped with his own hands: Kane’s mullet. What began almost as a dare four years ago has become a tradition.

Preiti estimated that as many as 30 clients have walked through his door requesting a Kane mullet since the beginning of the month.

Last Tuesday, Kane returned with teammate Brandon Saad, and left Preiti’s chair with his lucky charm, his fresh playoff mullet. (Photo by Carmelo Preiti)