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National Post Sports

Almost there: Eric Thames spent 15 minutes staring into his locker after the game, as though he had made a colossal mistake that cost his team a victory.All he had done was hit a home run before making a valiant leap at the left-field wall that nearly stole a homer from the Baltimore Orioles.But for Thames, the one that got away cut deep. In the Toronto Blue Jays’ 2-1 loss, that blast by Matt Wieters over Thames’ outstretched glove proved the difference. Photo: Patrick Smith/Reuters

Almost there: Eric Thames spent 15 minutes staring into his locker after the game, as though he had made a colossal mistake that cost his team a victory.

All he had done was hit a home run before making a valiant leap at the left-field wall that nearly stole a homer from the Baltimore Orioles.

But for Thames, the one that got away cut deep. In the Toronto Blue Jays’ 2-1 loss, that blast by Matt Wieters over Thames’ outstretched glove proved the difference. Photo: Patrick Smith/Reuters

Eric Thames started his first official day of spring training by sitting for 66 portraits.The Toronto Blue Jays outfielder accepted a tube of makeup and rubbed some on his nose and forehead to soften the glare. Then he settled into a fancy swivel chair to face his image-maker.The contraption is custom-made to secure six digital cameras at various angles in a vertical row. Big umbrellas reflect the strobe lighting just so, virtually eliminating facial shadows.Thames usually smiles a lot, but now he holds a solemn façade. Over the next five minutes, the computer-triggered cameras will take 66 photos of his head, part of a process to transform him into a 3D action figure for a video game. This is a small but essential step in the process that brings big-league players to life in the popular baseball simulation games MLB The Show and MLB 2K.Photo: John Lott/National Post

Eric Thames started his first official day of spring training by sitting for 66 portraits.

The Toronto Blue Jays outfielder accepted a tube of makeup and rubbed some on his nose and forehead to soften the glare. Then he settled into a fancy swivel chair to face his image-maker.

The contraption is custom-made to secure six digital cameras at various angles in a vertical row. Big umbrellas reflect the strobe lighting just so, virtually eliminating facial shadows.

Thames usually smiles a lot, but now he holds a solemn façade. Over the next five minutes, the computer-triggered cameras will take 66 photos of his head, part of a process to transform him into a 3D action figure for a video game. This is a small but essential step in the process that brings big-league players to life in the popular baseball simulation games MLB The Show and MLB 2K.
Photo: John Lott/National Post