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Stanislas Wawrinka added a win over Rafael Nadal to his list of firsts in a stunning run to his maiden Grand Slam title, extending his rival’s injury-cursed run at the Australian Open with a 6-3, 6-2, 3-6, 6-3 upset in Sunday’s final.

The 28-year-old Wawrinka had never taken a set off Nadal in 12 previous meetings, but attacked from the start against the 13-time major winner and regained his nerve after dropping the third set against the injured Spaniard.

Nadal appeared to be on the verge of retiring in the second set, when he hurt his back and needed a medical time out, but he refused to quit.

“It’s really not the way you want to win a tennis match, but in a Grand Slam final I’ll take it,” said Wawrinka, the first man in 21 years to beat the No. 1 and No. 2 ranked players en route to a Grand Slam title. (Photos: Saeed Khan/AFP/Getty Images, Paul Crock/AFP/Getty Images)

Game, set, match, love. Love is what it is and what it should be for Canadians since love is what it has been for tennis fans unlucky enough to be baking away in the unbearable Melbourne heat at the Australian Open, but fortunate enough to be witnessing the birth of a Canadian women’s tennis legend.To be following her around, awestruck and smitten, wearing their white, “Genie Army” T-shirts, with the red maple leaf and her name on the front, while cheering her every shot. Cheering. And groaning.Oh, yes, dying just a little on the inside when Genie Bouchard, the Montreal-born object of their tennis-fan affections, took a softball question from a reporter about who her dream date would be — after beating Ana Ivanovic Tuesday to secure a semi-final berth — and smashed it back with a resounding ouch by answering, “Justin Bieber.”The crowd roared. (Photo: AFP Photo/Fiona Hamilton/Tennis Australia)

Game, set, match, love. Love is what it is and what it should be for Canadians since love is what it has been for tennis fans unlucky enough to be baking away in the unbearable Melbourne heat at the Australian Open, but fortunate enough to be witnessing the birth of a Canadian women’s tennis legend.

To be following her around, awestruck and smitten, wearing their white, “Genie Army” T-shirts, with the red maple leaf and her name on the front, while cheering her every shot. Cheering. And groaning.

Oh, yes, dying just a little on the inside when Genie Bouchard, the Montreal-born object of their tennis-fan affections, took a softball question from a reporter about who her dream date would be — after beating Ana Ivanovic Tuesday to secure a semi-final berth — and smashed it back with a resounding ouch by answering, “Justin Bieber.”

The crowd roared. (Photo: AFP Photo/Fiona Hamilton/Tennis Australia)

Rafael Nadal made it abundantly clear how much he missed the last Australian Open with the manner of his third-round demolition of Gael Monfils.Top-seeded Nadal trounced No. 25-seeded Monfils 6-1, 6-2, 6-3 in two hours to finish off Saturday’s program on the Rod Laver Arena, then told the crowd it was “very emotional to have the chance to play that well here in Australia after missing last year.”He skipped it in 2013 during a seven-month layoff for illness and injuries, depriving him a chance to pick up two full sets of the Grand Slam titles.Nadal returned to win the French and U.S. Open crowns among his 10 titles last season and regained the year-end No. 1-ranking. The Australian Open is the only major Nadal has not won at least twice, with his sole triumph at Melbourne Park in 2009. The Spaniard lost an epic five-set final to Novak Djokovic two years ago. (Photo: Paul Crock/AFP/Getty Images)

Rafael Nadal made it abundantly clear how much he missed the last Australian Open with the manner of his third-round demolition of Gael Monfils.

Top-seeded Nadal trounced No. 25-seeded Monfils 6-1, 6-2, 6-3 in two hours to finish off Saturday’s program on the Rod Laver Arena, then told the crowd it was “very emotional to have the chance to play that well here in Australia after missing last year.”

He skipped it in 2013 during a seven-month layoff for illness and injuries, depriving him a chance to pick up two full sets of the Grand Slam titles.

Nadal returned to win the French and U.S. Open crowns among his 10 titles last season and regained the year-end No. 1-ranking. The Australian Open is the only major Nadal has not won at least twice, with his sole triumph at Melbourne Park in 2009. The Spaniard lost an epic five-set final to Novak Djokovic two years ago. (Photo: Paul Crock/AFP/Getty Images)

Lightning strikes over Melbourne Park during the first round doubles match between Rameez Junaid of Australia and Adrian Mannarino of France, and Rohan Bopanna of India and Aisam-Ul-Haq Qureshi of Pakistan during day four of the 2014 Australian Open at Melbourne Park on January 16, 2014 in Melbourne, Australia.  (Photo by Robert Prezioso/Getty Images)

Lightning strikes over Melbourne Park during the first round doubles match between Rameez Junaid of Australia and Adrian Mannarino of France, and Rohan Bopanna of India and Aisam-Ul-Haq Qureshi of Pakistan during day four of the 2014 Australian Open at Melbourne Park on January 16, 2014 in Melbourne, Australia.  (Photo by Robert Prezioso/Getty Images)

Maria Sharapova toiled in 43-degree Celsius (109 F) temperatures for more than 3 1/2 hours on Rod Laver Arena and could count herself among the unlucky early starters at the oppressively hot Australian Open on Thursday.

Organizers invoked their ‘Extreme Heat Policy’ and the roofs on the two main arenas were closed in the afternoon. Matches on outside courts, meanwhile, were suspended for more than four hours until temperatures dropped.

At the height of the heat, Sharapova, dripping in sweat, wasted three match points on serve in the 10th game of the third set, and then had to save break points and serve to stay in the match.

No. 25-seeded Alize Cornet of France, who will play Sharapova next, sobbed on court Thursday after her draining 6-3, 4-6, 6-4 victory, then blasted officials for not halting play sooner.

“On Tuesday, I don’t know why they didn’t stop matches,” she said. “It was an oven. An oven. It was burning. Why today and not Tuesday?

“I went really further than my limits. It was really hot, that’s why I’m so emotional,” Cornet said of the conditions. (Photos: Mal Fairclough/AFP/Getty Images, William West/AFP/Getty Images)

'I saw Snoopy': If the forecast of four consecutive days of 40-plus degrees Celsius (104-plus degrees Fahrenheit) temperatures in Melbourne proves correct, it will be the worst heat wave in the city in more than a century.

Canada’s Frank Dancevic collapsed during his match at the Australian Open on Tuesday. He later told reporters he saw Snoopy in a hallucination.

“I was dizzy from the middle of the first set and then I saw Snoopy and I thought, ‘Wow Snoopy, that’s weird,’” Dancevic said. (Photos: Aijaz Rahi/The Associated Press)

The best reason for a delay: Karrie Webb of Australia waits for the kangaroos to clear the fairway during day one at the LPGA Australian Open. Instead, they should just ask them to join in. Have you ever seen a kangaroo with a nine iron? Watch out. (Photo: Stefan Postles/Getty Images)
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The best reason for a delay: Karrie Webb of Australia waits for the kangaroos to clear the fairway during day one at the LPGA Australian Open. Instead, they should just ask them to join in. Have you ever seen a kangaroo with a nine iron? Watch out. (Photo: Stefan Postles/Getty Images)

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Andy Murray sends home Roger Federer at Australian OpenAndy Murray has finally beaten Roger Federer at a Grand Slam. U.S. Open champion Murray stayed in the hunt for a second consecutive major with a 6-4, 6-7 (5), 6-3, 6-7 (2), 6-2 win Friday over the 17-time major champion at the Australian Open.Murray, who served for the match at 6-5 in the fourth set, will play defending champion and top-seeded Novak Djokovic, who was rarely troubled while beating David Ferrer in straight sets in just under 90 minutes on Thursday night, about 2 1/2 hours less than Friday’s semi-final. (MANAN VATSYAYANA/AFP/Getty Images)

Andy Murray sends home Roger Federer at Australian Open
Andy Murray has finally beaten Roger Federer at a Grand Slam. U.S. Open champion Murray stayed in the hunt for a second consecutive major with a 6-4, 6-7 (5), 6-3, 6-7 (2), 6-2 win Friday over the 17-time major champion at the Australian Open.

Murray, who served for the match at 6-5 in the fourth set, will play defending champion and top-seeded Novak Djokovic, who was rarely troubled while beating David Ferrer in straight sets in just under 90 minutes on Thursday night, about 2 1/2 hours less than Friday’s semi-final. (MANAN VATSYAYANA/AFP/Getty Images)

So, um, that went well … Serena Williams smashes her racquet during her women’s singles match against compatriot Sloane Stephens. (Photo: PAUL CROCK/AFP/Getty Images)


Williams hurt her back in the eighth game of the second set, hampering her serve. She had treatment and recovered well enough to give herself a shot at winning the match, but the 19-year-old Stephens kept her composure in a 3-6, 7-5, 6-4 victory on Wednesday.
It was the first loss since Aug. 17 for the 15-time Grand Slam winner, ending a run of 20 consecutive wins. She hadn’t lost a match at a Grand Slam tournament since the French Open, where her first-round exit sparked a resurgence in the second half of 2012 that included titles at Wimbledon, the London Olympics, the U.S. Open and the WTA Championship.

So, um, that went well … Serena Williams smashes her racquet during her women’s singles match against compatriot Sloane Stephens. (Photo: PAUL CROCK/AFP/Getty Images)

Williams hurt her back in the eighth game of the second set, hampering her serve. She had treatment and recovered well enough to give herself a shot at winning the match, but the 19-year-old Stephens kept her composure in a 3-6, 7-5, 6-4 victory on Wednesday.

It was the first loss since Aug. 17 for the 15-time Grand Slam winner, ending a run of 20 consecutive wins. She hadn’t lost a match at a Grand Slam tournament since the French Open, where her first-round exit sparked a resurgence in the second half of 2012 that included titles at Wimbledon, the London Olympics, the U.S. Open and the WTA Championship.

From dawn ‘till dusk: Novak Djokovic plays a return during his men’s singles match against Czech Republic’s Tomas Berdych on the nineth day of the Australian Open tennis tournament. (Photo: Peter Parks/AFP/Getty Images)

From dawn ‘till dusk: Novak Djokovic plays a return during his men’s singles match against Czech Republic’s Tomas Berdych on the nineth day of the Australian Open tennis tournament. (Photo: Peter Parks/AFP/Getty Images)