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Derek Jeter soaked in the adulation from fans and players during one more night on baseball’s national stage, set the tone for the American League with a pregame speech and then delivered two final All-Star hits.Mike Trout, perhaps the top candidate to succeed the 40-year-old Yankees captain as the face of the game, seemed ready to assume the role with a tiebreaking triple and later a go-ahead double that earned the 22-year-old MVP honours.On a summer evening filled with reminders of generational change, the AL kept up nearly two decades of dominance by beating the National League 5-3 Tuesday for its 13th win in 17 years."I think let Mike be Mike. I don’t think people have to necessarily appoint someone to a particular position," Jeter said. "He’s got a bright future ahead of him. I don’t know how much better he can get, but if he consistently does what he’s doing, then he will be here for a long time." (Photo: Elsa/Getty Images)

Derek Jeter soaked in the adulation from fans and players during one more night on baseball’s national stage, set the tone for the American League with a pregame speech and then delivered two final All-Star hits.

Mike Trout, perhaps the top candidate to succeed the 40-year-old Yankees captain as the face of the game, seemed ready to assume the role with a tiebreaking triple and later a go-ahead double that earned the 22-year-old MVP honours.

On a summer evening filled with reminders of generational change, the AL kept up nearly two decades of dominance by beating the National League 5-3 Tuesday for its 13th win in 17 years.

"I think let Mike be Mike. I don’t think people have to necessarily appoint someone to a particular position," Jeter said. "He’s got a bright future ahead of him. I don’t know how much better he can get, but if he consistently does what he’s doing, then he will be here for a long time." (Photo: Elsa/Getty Images)

At a party 24 years in the making, hundreds of thousands of Germans showed their admiration and adoration for their World Cup winners at a victory parade to the Brandenburg Gate on Tuesday.German soccer players from left:  Lukas Podolski, Jerome Boateng and Mesut Ozil celebrate on stage. An estimated 400,000 people packed the “fan mile” in front of the Berlin landmark to welcome home coach Joachim Loew’s team and the trophy. (Photo: Alex Grimm/The Associated Press)

At a party 24 years in the making, hundreds of thousands of Germans showed their admiration and adoration for their World Cup winners at a victory parade to the Brandenburg Gate on Tuesday.

German soccer players from left:  Lukas Podolski, Jerome Boateng and Mesut Ozil celebrate on stage. An estimated 400,000 people packed the “fan mile” in front of the Berlin landmark to welcome home coach Joachim Loew’s team and the trophy. (Photo: Alex Grimm/The Associated Press)

Contador crashes out: Italy’s Vincenzo Nibali stamped his dominance on the Tour de France by winning Stage 10 in the Vosges mountains on Monday — shortly after his biggest rival for the title, two-time champion Alberto Contador, crashed out with a fractured shin after a high-speed spill.

According to his spokesman, Contador said he wasn’t exactly sure what caused the crash — which happened while he was speeding downhill at over 70 kph about halfway through the stage. Contador began the stage in ninth place overall — 4 minutes, 8 seconds back of Gallopin.

TV images showed thick streams of blood pouring from Contador’s right knee after the crash, his hip was scraped up, and the back of his jersey torn. Team director Bjarne Riis rushed over and bandaged the knee. Philippe Mauduit, a team sporting director, said initial X-rays showed that a Contador had a fractured shin.

The Spaniard rode on for about another half-hour, clearly in pain, and finally stopped, got off, wiped his eyes and climbed into a team car. (Photos: Christophe Ena/The Associated Press, Lionel Bonaventure/AFP/Getty Images)

The Toronto Raptors kept on saying it. It did not matter if it was Dwane Casey, Masai Ujiri or Kyle Lowry who was speaking. Their seven-game series against the Brooklyn Nets, the one that ended with a gut-punch of a one-point defeat on home court, was a “learning experience.”
The thing about such opportunities is you can never really know if anybody went ahead and learned anything tangible. For the Raptors, we will not start to see the answer until November, and will probably not be fully informed until next season’s playoffs are over, assuming the Raptors make it back there.
Of all of the Raptors’ pupils, Terrence Ross endured the harshest lesson. He started each of the seven games, sure, but that was more about the Raptors’ lack of options on the wing than Ross’s play. He shot just 30% from the field, averaging only 5.0 points per game. (Photo: Darren Calabrese/National Post)

The Toronto Raptors kept on saying it. It did not matter if it was Dwane Casey, Masai Ujiri or Kyle Lowry who was speaking. Their seven-game series against the Brooklyn Nets, the one that ended with a gut-punch of a one-point defeat on home court, was a “learning experience.”

The thing about such opportunities is you can never really know if anybody went ahead and learned anything tangible. For the Raptors, we will not start to see the answer until November, and will probably not be fully informed until next season’s playoffs are over, assuming the Raptors make it back there.

Of all of the Raptors’ pupils, Terrence Ross endured the harshest lesson. He started each of the seven games, sure, but that was more about the Raptors’ lack of options on the wing than Ross’s play. He shot just 30% from the field, averaging only 5.0 points per game. (Photo: Darren Calabrese/National Post)

In the NBA, it always comes back to Michael Jordan. When LeBron James left Cleveland for Miami four years ago, people could not help but invoke Jordan. When Chicago stumbled against the Pistons year after year, Jordan did not bolt for a better situation. He did not bail when things got difficult.Of course, it was a silly, lazy way to look at things. It ignored all sorts of different contextual information — particularly the style of roster building that had gained popularity in the league, the constrictions of the NBA’s salary cap and luxury tax and the complete failure of Cleveland management to put him in a position to succeed.However, in one way, James has always been like Mike: He seemed determined to write his own story. Jordan won three championships, and then walked away from basketball to try his hand at baseball. After nearly two years in the Chicago White Sox minor-league system, he came back to the Bulls, and won three more titles. (Let’s not discuss his sojourn in Washington.) It was a unique path, befitting a player whose talents and will transcended what we had seen before.Now, James has done the same. (Photo: Mark Duncan/The Associated Press)

In the NBA, it always comes back to Michael Jordan. When LeBron James left Cleveland for Miami four years ago, people could not help but invoke Jordan. When Chicago stumbled against the Pistons year after year, Jordan did not bolt for a better situation. He did not bail when things got difficult.

Of course, it was a silly, lazy way to look at things. It ignored all sorts of different contextual information — particularly the style of roster building that had gained popularity in the league, the constrictions of the NBA’s salary cap and luxury tax and the complete failure of Cleveland management to put him in a position to succeed.

However, in one way, James has always been like Mike: He seemed determined to write his own story. Jordan won three championships, and then walked away from basketball to try his hand at baseball. After nearly two years in the Chicago White Sox minor-league system, he came back to the Bulls, and won three more titles. (Let’s not discuss his sojourn in Washington.) It was a unique path, befitting a player whose talents and will transcended what we had seen before.

Now, James has done the same. (Photo: Mark Duncan/The Associated Press)

The golden gates of football’s Olympus may yet swing open Sunday to admit Lionel Messi.

On a cool, wet, night long on discipline and distressingly short on artistry — an anti-Messi evening if there ever was one — the planet’s greatest player reached his first World Cup final, and Argentina’s first in 24 long years, 4-2 on penalties following a dire, defensive 0-0 draw through 120 bob-and-weave minutes against the Netherlands.

While this could still wind up being Messi’s tournament (although it’s doubtful German boss Joachim Low lost any sleep watching the dire goings-on at Arena Sao Paulo) Wednesday night belonged to others, to mere mortals. (Photos: Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images; Victor R. Caivano/The Associated Press)

Brazilian newspapers highlight the defeat of Brazil to Germany by 7-1 in their semi-final match of the FIFA World Cup, in Brasilia on July 9, 2014.  Devastating World Cup loss penetrates the soul of Brazil (Photo: Evaristo Sa/AFP/Getty Images)

Brazilian newspapers highlight the defeat of Brazil to Germany by 7-1 in their semi-final match of the FIFA World Cup, in Brasilia on July 9, 2014.  

Devastating World Cup loss penetrates the soul of Brazil (Photo: Evaristo Sa/AFP/Getty Images)

A Brazilian fan holds a mask depicting Brazil’s Neymar before the semi-final football match between Brazil and Germany at The Mineirao Stadium in Belo Horizonte during the 2014 FIFA World Cup on July 8, 2014. Neymar masks were featured on the front pages of at least two Brazilian newspapers on Tuesday. (Photo: Adrian Dennis/AFP/Getty Images)

A Brazilian fan holds a mask depicting Brazil’s Neymar before the semi-final football match between Brazil and Germany at The Mineirao Stadium in Belo Horizonte during the 2014 FIFA World Cup on July 8, 2014. Neymar masks were featured on the front pages of at least two Brazilian newspapers on Tuesday. (Photo: Adrian Dennis/AFP/Getty Images)

Lightning strikes in the background during the seventh inning of a baseball game between the Colorado Rockies and the San Diego Padres on Monday, July 7, 2014, in Denver. (Photo: Jack Dempsey/The Associated Press)

Lightning strikes in the background during the seventh inning of a baseball game between the Colorado Rockies and the San Diego Padres on Monday, July 7, 2014, in Denver. (Photo: Jack Dempsey/The Associated Press)

Mark Casse finally has his first Queen’s Plate victory.

Filly Lexie Lou captured the $1-million race Sunday at Woodbine Racetrack, giving the six-time Sovereign Award winner as Canada’s top trainer his first Plate win. The 53-year-old American came close in 2011, finishing second to Inglorious with Hippolytus, but admitted becoming emotional after Lexie Lou crossed the finish line 1 1/2-lengths ahead of runner-up Ami’s Holiday, a 9-1 longshot.

“My son, Colby, just started crying afterwards and to see it mean that much to him got me crying,” said Casse, a 34-year racing veteran. “There was a lot of crying … I think I would’ve been OK had Colby not started crying.

“When all you’ve done your entire life is been around race horses … I really don’t know anything else. I’ve been following the Queen’s Plate since I was a little boy and so to finally win it, I just pinch myself. I thought we’d win it sooner or later. I knew I wasn’t going to give up.” (Photos: Fred Thornhill/The Canadian Press, Chris Young/The Canadian Press)